ross bleckner

21Jan11

An older book of mine was left open on a page with three paintings– One by Terry Winters, one by Ross Bleckner and one by Susan Rothenberg. I left it open on my dresser for a few days to think about them. All three painters were a big deal for me as an undergraduate. And all of them are still influential, in their way. But Bleckner is especially long-lasting for inspiration. His paintings are biological and mineral and sonic. They hum and glow inside a space that could be vast and miniature at once. Also very memorable is a published page from a sketchbook of his where two images are juxtaposed: the back of a young man with acne and a shot of a galaxy. As you can imagine, the forms and arrangement are similar, and I love the mental flip of that choice. I love that it beautifies something we normally perceive as unattractive, and I love that it connects the phenomena that occur at every scale and on every surface of the natural world, echoing and folding like so many origami mysteries.

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3 Responses to “ross bleckner”

  1. When speaking of the juxtaposition of the two images it reminds me in a loose way of this clip I saw recently of Steve Tobin: http://www.stevetobin.com/index2.html
    He talks about the relationships of the explosions he does in clay to the explosions of mountain scapes. . . .which also reminds me of the lovely manifestations of Margaret Werheim’s Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGEDHMF4rLI&feature=related

    Thanks for the tip off to Bleckner, really beautiful stuff!

    • I love that hyperbolic crochet project! I first read about it in Cabinet, but hadn’t seen many images. They are astounding, and especially fantastic as physical, experiential math. Which also makes me think of this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heKK95DAKms

      • That video is really interesting! I always did well in math, but I have always hated it, it seemed so irrelevant. But now as I reflect, this connection between the two explains so much. . .like why I love symmetry and get giddy over patterns, etc. Its sad that, at least at the college I attended, an art degree was the only discipline that required no math credits. Art transcends into multidisciplinarian worlds, science, math, etc. It helps us understand those fields in a deeper, more meaningful way. So much to learn.


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